PANELS

/PANELS
PANELS 2018-04-10T09:06:01+00:00

Panel discussion intro:

Radio and Public Relations Today

Radio continues to be an important part of many people’s daily lives.  It is a source of news and listening pleasure for millions.  But radio is also facing new competition and challenges from streaming services. Never has there been more competition for peoples’ time – particularly for the young.  Despite those challenges, Radio can have a bright future.  The panel will debate how Radio will stay relevant and fresh and the role communications can play in making that happen.

Panel discussion intro:

Public Relations and Public Relations Agencies

What is the role of PR agencies for organizations who now control own communication channels? There is more communication around us than ever before in humans history. Everybody is out there, shouting, demanding attention and nobody is – at least it seems like – listening anymore.  How should organizations think strategical communications in the age of social media? What is the real value and how disruptive influencers, bloggers, and mini media really are? How to communicate with haters, how to control organizations perception in the age when everybody and anybody has a voice?

Costumers expect organizations to be more transparent than ever before. Companies, governments, public offices, and NGOs are under constant negative publicity threat, scandals, dissatisfied consumers. Products, services, and brands are not owned by companies as consumers redefine everything organizations put on the market.

Panel discussion intro:

How Media Representatives Perceive Public Relations Industry

Public relations vs. journalists and media – eternal dilemma, eternal struggle. Are there limits? Co-operation on the edge? Or, in fact, everyone is doing their job, which the other side must respect. PR and the media are directed to each other, so there is no such thing as – cooperation. Relations between journalists and public relations professionals have always been an issue that engages attention. Although undeniably interdependent and unavoidably based on cooperation, relations between the two professions have been complicated and difficult from the beginning. This has been confirmed by many scientific studies conducted worldwide. But the times and the environment are changing and we should expect a change in the relationship between these natural (foes) friends. Relationships between public relations practitioners and the media should be straightforward and based on mutual trust and goals, but like every relationship, these are as good or as bad as the individuals involved.